Simple Present Tense

What is Simple Present Tense

Simple present tense is also called present simple. We use the simple present tense to talk about regular or habitual actions.It is the most basic and common tense in English and it’s really important to understand well.

How do we make the simple present tense?

This page will explain the rules for forming the simple present tense sentences. We want to remember the general structure of English sentences before we start. In this way, you can easily understand .

First, let us see the structure of simple present tense.

General Structure

1. Affirmative (Positive) Sentence

Subject Verb Rest of the sentence
I, We, You, They Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence.
He, She, It Verb -e(s)(Present) Rest of the sentence.

2. Negative Sentence

Subject Auxiliary Verb Rest of the sentence
I, We, You, They do + not Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence.
He, She, It does + not Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence.
  • 3. Yes/No type Question
Auxiliary Subject Verb Rest of the sentence
Do I, We, You, They Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence.
Does He, She, It Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence.
  • 4.Information Question?
Question Word Auxiliary Subject Verb Rest of the sentence
QW Do I, We, You, They Verb Rest of the sentence.
QW Does He, She, It Verb Rest of the sentence.

Important Note:

  • Verb – present
  • Auxiliary verb – Do and Does
  • I, We, You, They – Do
  • He, She, It – Does

1. Affirmative (Positive) Sentences

Subject Verb (Present Tense) Rest of the sentence
I work on my website every day.
You learn English at home.
We like joyful music.
He speaks English well.
She writes a letter.
It takes time.
They play cricket every Sunday.

Rules:

2. Negative Sentences

Subject Auxiliary + Not Verb (Present Tense) Rest of the sentence
I do not work on my website every day.
You do not learn English at home.
We do not like joyful music.
He does not speak English well.
She does not write a letter.
It does not take time.
They do not play cricket every Sunday.

Rules:

  • Auxiliary verbs “Do and Does” are necessary to use.
  • I, We , You, They – Do.
  • He, She, It (3rd person singular) – Does.
  • -(e)s is never used. It is only used in affirmative sentences.

3. Yes/No type Question

Auxiliary Subject Verb (Present Tense) Rest of the sentence?
Do I work on my website every day?
Do you learn English at home?
Do we like joyful music?
Does he speak English well?
Does She write a letter?
Does it take time?
Do they play cricket every Sunday?
Does Ram live in Chennai?

Rules:

  • The Auxiliary verb Do and Does are used in the beginning of the sentences.
  • I, We , You, They – Do
  • He, She, It (3rd person singular) – Does
  • -(e)s is never used. It ends with question mark (?).

4. Information Questions

Question Word Auxiliary Subject Verb(Present) Rest of the sentence?
When do I work on my website?
Where do you learn English?
Which music do we like ?
How does he speak English?
What does she write ?
How long does it take ?
Where do they play cricket every Sunday?
Where does Ram live ?

Rules:

  • Question words are used in the beginning of the sentences.
  • I, We , You, They – Do
  • He, She, It (3rd person singular) – Does
  • -(e)s is never used. It ends with question mark (?).

When should we use the simple present tense?

Now we know how to make the present simple sentences. We use simple present tense in several different situations.

Use 1: Repeated Actions

Use the Simple Present to express the idea that an action is repeated or regular. The action can be a daily event, a habit, a hobby, a scheduled event or something that often happens.

  • I walk to work every day.
  • When does the train usually leave?
  • Ram speaks English very well.
  • Tom lives in India

Use 2 Facts or Generalizations

We use the Simple Present for statements that are always true:

  • We come from Switzerland.
  • Summer follows spring.
  • The moon travels around the earth.

Use 3 Future reference

This use is often related to timetables and events in the calendar

  • The train leaves tonight at 6 PM.
  • The concert begins at 7.30 and ends at 9.30.
  • The party starts at 8 o’clock.

Use 4 Observations and declarations

We commonly use the Simple Present with other verbs to make observations and declarations in the course of conversation:

  • I hope/assume/suppose/promise everything will be all right.
  • I declare this exhibition open.
9 comments on “Simple Present Tense
  1. NARAYANAN V says:

    I got very good understanding for tense of simple present.
    I am happy for i know the whatisgrammar.com website.

    Thanking you,
    Narayanan.V

  2. Jimmy sona says:

    I learnt so easily tense of simple present..it is really a good website.
    Thank you whaisgrammar.com

  3. janitha says:

    really very good and clear explanation.easy to understand.thank you whatisgrammar.com.

  4. Arpit Gaikwad says:

    Nice job done my “whatisgrammer” team. I appreciate your effort. I learned the basic concepts from this website.

  5. samisma says:

    The web really help the beginner to understand English language very well. Thanks

  6. it is importan to learn here and easy

  7. Jorge says:

    exellent I have got a really good simple present explanation from this page, thanks, my students thank you. :)

  8. irfan says:

    really easy to learn

  9. Abdul SHAHID says:

    Simple present tense explained in simple way.

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